Everyone wants integration, but there are lots of ways to go about it. Here are a few examples, all constructed as spokes on a bicycle wheel. Each speaks to unity in the art of living.

The yin-yang mandala is the all-time classic. Opposite forces are interconnected and interdependent:

yin-yang-wheel
yin-yang-wheel

Mind-body-spirit is our most popular formula for health:

mind-body-spirit-wheel
mind-body-spirit-wheel

In Paleo circles, we see a more expansive unity in which mind-body-spirit are coupled with land-ancestors-tribe:

primal-holism-2
primal-holism-2

The 4 H club offers its own version of unity: head, hands, health and heart:

4-H-club
4-H-club

Thirty years ago George L. Engel  highlighted the limitations of the traditional biomedical model and advocated the endorsement of a biopsychosocial approach:

bio-psych-social
bio-psych-social

Dr. David Katz has given us this creative vision for holistic health: Feet for exercise, forks for nutrition, fingers for choice and forest for  big picture ideas that give our lives meaning.

feet-forks-fingers-forest
feet-forks-fingers-forest

Dr. Dan Siegel teaches that mindfulness has three fundamental qualities: openness, observation and objectivity:

mindfullness-OOO
mindfullness-OOO

The formula for sustainable business practice; the triple-bottom line:

triple-bottom-line
triple-bottom-line

Finally, the 8-fold path of Buddhism: right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness and right concentration:

8-fold-path
8-fold-path

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